Multi-award winning musician Jah Prayzah has dismantled his Military Touch Movement (MTM), about three years after its formation and freed artistes who were contracted to his stable. Military Touch Movement is the vibrant ensemble that once housed music talents in the form of Andy Muridzo, ExQ, Tahle Wedzinza, Nutty O and producers DJ Tamuka and Daniel Chiweda before they decided to pursue solo careers.

When the movement was formed, in January 2017, Jah Prayzah said all artistes to be signed would be treated equally and even benefit more than him, but about two years down the line, cracks had started to emerge amid allegations of artistes’ suppression at the expense of the proprietor’s projects thereby disadvantaging other artistes.

According to sources close to Jah Prayzah’s camp and some artistes who once signed for the movement, the purported suppression of musicians by the Kutonga Kwaro hitmaker was a direct shift from the agreement they had when they signed up to join the stable.

Those who jumped ship earlier claimed it would have been a better home had all the contracted artistes been treated equally.

The Kutonga Kwaro hitmaker has however, been on record vehemently dismissing the suppression allegations.

In an unexpected statement on Sunday, Jah Prayzah said he felt that all the artists under MTM had outgrown the stable and needed to flourish on their own.

“When I started MTM, my dream was to have a movement that is driven solely by the ambition of the artists and producers involved in it.

“It has been three years since we began the journey and I can say it has been fruitful. Today we celebrate superstars who have been housed in MTM and that was part of the mission, for us all to grow together and celebrate our achievements together,” he said.

“I feel everyone who was involved in MTM is now in a position where they can now also take part in grooming and raising more talent out there. I appreciate the trust that was given to me by these artists who are now brands and also for the privilege of working with legends like ExQ who have been in the game for so many years even before the start of my musical career. It is not an easy process to be able to trust putting your brand under someone else’s umbrella.”

Jah Prayzah said MTM was a movement put in place to encourage growth and not for profit adding that he did not collect any money from all the artists who were involved in the movement.

“I have done my part in putting in the little resources I had at that time, but do feel the artists have outgrown the label and though it is painful, I feel it is the right time to release them and also terminate all contracts that were in place. What is important is the growth of talent as opposed to any return on money put in,” he said.

“Having been subjected to so much abuse at some points in this journey, I have become really skeptical about recruiting new artists under MTM as this in many occurrences has tainted my brand. The main objective, however, was not to get praise from helping artists achieve their dreams. I have decided, I will proceed with finding other artists from the grassroots and will put in my effort to ensure they are talked about and their music grows.”

NewsDay